Wednesday, June 14, 2017

2017 Year in Review



One of the questions I had going into this year was "how much would my practices change this time?"  Its never possible to figure everything out but after two years one can certainly establish patterns and routines and move towards smaller refinements.  Its fairly normal for improvements to slow down or become more subtle at the same time.

So I went back through my blog, especially through the last 2 year end reviews.

For the most part I still agree with my thinking from past years but on reflection I think this year has been different from the last two and I've made some important changes.

As always my key goal is to generate and sustain enthusiasm among the kids and to get them to engage with as many  challenging problems as I can manage without losing them along the way. This year in particular I think I made strides towards engagement.

VNPS (Vertical Non Permanent Surfaces)

This was probably my biggest discovery for the year. See: http://mymathclub.blogspot.com/2017/03/328-vnps.html  In the past while I used whiteboards during student demos or while I was explaining a concept, it never occurred to me that it would work so well for group problem solving.  I found I could keep kids going on a problem set much longer in this format than in paper even while both involved group work.  I think there was also good carry over week to week. A successful session set the stage for more focus the next time.   What I liked best was setting up 2-3 problems on all the boards and letting the kids switch between problems as they wished.  I then could stop by a cluster and watch and ask questions.

2 Things I'll keep working on here:
  • Work on listening carefully and not just floating when this is going on. Its easy to watch the kids working on the boards and be excited about the energy rather than focusing on the work they are producing.
  • Integrate gallery walks at the end, where the group goes through the solutions that were found. I started doing this more consistently at the end of the term.

Structure

As I've mentioned before, my thinking on warmups and how to layout a session has evolved a bit this year. My old structure was often a 10-15 minute "warmup" and then a main activity. Over time what I've come to realize is that Math is not baseball.  Warming up is the wrong metaphor for the process. In practice, after doing my first welcome speech for the day when I talk about what we're going to do and having kids go over their solutions to the problem of the week, I've usually provided enough routine for all the kids to transition to thinking about Math.  Instead, what I usually find is the kids benefit from breaks in the middle and the end of the problem solving process.   The need for  pauses is especially evident with problems that are challenging and not quickly solved. So nowadays I usually assume an average focus length of 30 minutes and I'll take something like a kenken puzzle and hold it in reserve for those moments. When kids flag, I'll have them switch gears for a little while or perhaps the remaining time. 
  
This doesn't mean I don't sometimes do a 2 part activity.  This can still be valuable if the first part directly relates to the second. For example: coloring in Pascal's triangle for patterns was a great setup for looking at combinations.  But if I have a great main activity, my first inclination is just dive in and let it take the whole time if necessary.  As a result, I've been printing and saving puzzles over multiple weeks much more often.

Games

This was an early focus for me this year. I didn't end up using games every week but whenever I found one that I thought was mathematically interesting I consciously tried to build a session around it.  I think  my favorite 2 for the year were Rational Tangles  and Attack of the Clones.  When I repeat activities, The challenge here is to continue finding new ones when you've worked with the same kids for several years.  I usually find kids don't mind/don't remember the first time nearly as clearly as I do/fear and I do reuse several categories of puzzles like the skyscraper puzzles this spring.

I also am still working on connecting the games explicitly to underlying Mathematics and making the time to talk about the games after we play them.  (This dovetails with my structural shifts. When you just dive in, there is more time left for a post-discussions and you run out of time early less often.)

AMC

I was very happy with my experiment getting the kids to try out AMC8. These also provide a little structure in the beginning of the year.  Competition brings out focus that a normal sheet of problems would never elicit. Next year, I'm going to try to leverage that a bit and use practice tests as a way to motivate kids to try and discuss problems more explicitly.

Video Integration

This year I chopped videos up a lot more than I did previously. Wherever I saw opportunities to discuss or try something out I would just pause.  For instance, during the video on proofs every time a problem was introduced we turned on the lights and tried it out as a group first before hearing the solution. I'm also really happy with the serendipitous alignment of my random topic choices and the final "Infinite Series" video on slicing a n-dimensional cube.

One experiment I'm still evaluating in my mind, was showing the MathCounts final. Kids are still asking to see more clips from MathCounts. So it definitely was popular. I'm not sure if it sent the right message about speed and ability though.

Guest Speaker

Going through the work to arrange a guest speaker was definitely worth it. I will try to maintain my relationship with the UW Math dept. going forward. In my ideal world, I could have a roster of speakers through the whole year.  Since that's not possible video clips act as a surrogate for this experience letting the kids see and hear more mathematicians. Also I'm toying with the idea of having the kids expand on my: http://mymathclub.blogspot.com/2017/05/questions-for-mathematicians.html. I'm hoping we could get a lot more responses.


Challenges

The biggest one for me is trying to ensure that the club transitions beyond my departure. I'm currently working hard to recruit folks for next year.  At the same time, I'm also starting to brainstorm about the differences in running a M.S. vs an E.S. club. I  expect to have to make many changes next year with older kids.


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